Photos

 

Cleveland Landmarks

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    Hope Memorial Bridge

    The Hope Memorial Bridge, formerly the Lorain-Carnegie Bridge, is a 5,865 foot long art deco truss bridge crossing the Cuyahoga River. A bond issue to pay for the bridge was passed in 1921, but construction was delayed for years due to squabbles over how the money would be spent. The bridge was completed in 1932 at a cost of $4.75M. It was renovated in the 1980s and renamed in honor of William Henry Hope, a local stonemason and father of Bob Hope. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on October 8, 1976.

    Photo by Marc Moss

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    Free Stamp

    The Free Stamp is an outdoor sculpture located in Willard Park. Created by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, it has been called the "world's largest rubber stamp".

    Photo by Ron Dauphin

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    Progressive Field

    Construction started in January 1992, and by May of that year, the concrete construction had been poured. The ballpark opened on April 4, 1994, named "Jacobs Field" for former team owner Richard Jacobs, who paid for the naming rights until the end of 2006. President Bill Clinton threw out the ceremonial first pitch, and the Indians defeated the Seattle Mariners 4–3 in 11 innings.In 2008 the name was changed to Progressive Field after its naming rights were purchased by the Progressive Insurance Company.

    Photo by Adam Sonnett

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    Cleveland Browns Stadium

    Cleveland Browns Stadium sits on the former site of Cleveland Municipal Stadium, which was the team's home for 49 years. Ground was broken on May 15, 1997, the stadium opened in July 1999. The first Browns game at the stadium was played on September 12, 1999.

    Photo by Erik Daniel Drost

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    West Side Market

    It opened in 1840 as open air market across the street from its current location. Cleveland architectural firm Hubbell and Benes was contracted to create the new indoor space and, after nearly a decade of planning and construction, the current West Side Market building was finished in 1912 at a cost of nearly $680,000. On December 18, 1973, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

    Photo by scorchedearth

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    James A. Garfield Memorial

    The James A. Garfield Memorial was built in memory of the 20th U.S. President, James A. Garfield, who was assassinated in 1881. The memorial is located at 12316 Euclid Avenue in Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio. The caskets of the President and Lucretia Garfield are in its crypt, along with the ashes of their daughter and son-in-law.

    Photo by Bruce Fingerhood

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    Cleveland Cultural Gardens

    The Cleveland Cultural Gardens are a collection of public gardens located in Rockefeller Park in Cleveland, Ohio. The gardens are situated along Martin Luther King Jr. Drive within the 276 acre of wooded parkland on the city's East Side. In total, there are 31 distinct gardens, each commemorating a different ethnic group whose immigrants have contributed to the heritage of the United States over the centuries, as well as Cleveland.

    Photo by stu_spivack

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    Cleveland Metroparks Zoo

    The Cleveland Metroparks Zoo was founded in 1882, which makes it the seventh oldest zoo in the United States. The zoo, originally called Cleveland Zoological Park, first opened at Wade Park in 1882 on the current location of Cleveland Museum of Art. In 1907, the city of Cleveland moved the zoo to its current location, and the zoo acquired its first elephant. Starting in 1910 the zoo built Monkey Island, Sea Lion Pools and bear exhibit. In 1940, the zoo received its third Elephant. Between 1955 and the transfer of management to the Cleveland Metroparks in 1975 the zoo experienced much expansion and at the same time some setbacks due to flooding. In 1975, construction began on The Primate & Cat Building, in 1992 The Rainforest, followed by Wolf Wilderness in 1997, Australian Adventure in 2000, and The Sarah Allison Steffee Center for Zoological Medicine in 2004.

    Photo by sfgamchick

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    Terminal Tower

    The Terminal Tower is a landmark skyscraper located on Public Square in downtown Cleveland, Ohio. It was built during the skyscraper boom of the 1920s and 1930s, and was the fourth-tallest building in the world when it was officially dedicated on June 28, 1930. Built for $179 million by the Van Sweringen brothers, the tower was to serve as an office building atop the city's new rail station, the Cleveland Union Terminal.

    Photo by thegilmanator

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    Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument

    The Cuyahoga County Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument is a monument to Civil War soldiers and sailors from Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Located in the southeast quadrant of Public Square in downtown Cleveland, it was designed by architect Levi Scofield, who also created the monument's sculptures and opened July 4, 1894.

    Photo by Jon Dawson

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    PlayhouseSquare Center

    PlayhouseSquare, in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, is the second-largest theater complex in the United States. In the early 1920's the Ohio, State, Hanna, Allen and Palace Theatre's were opened. The theaters successfully showed a variety of serious theater, vaudeville shows, and movies for over forty years. attendence declined in teh 1950's and 60's and the theaters were subsequently closed down, but were revived through a grassroots effort. Their renovation and reopening helped usher in a new era of downtown revitalization in Cleveland, and was called "one of the top ten successes in Cleveland history." In 1978, the Playhouse Square Group was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

    Photo by stu_spivack

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    Old Stone Church

    The Old Stone Church is a historic Presbyterian church located in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, and is the oldest building on Public Square. In June 1819, the Union Sunday School began meeting on the site of the current church, and on September 19, 1820, fifteen Clevelanders, some ten percent of the then-village's population, signed a charter officially establishing the congregation. It was formally incorporated in 1827 as The First Presbyterian Society, and in 1834 the first church was built out of gray sandstone. The Old Stone Church has stood virtually unchanged to this day, and is the last remaining church designed by the Heard and Porter architectural firm.

    Photo by Jon Dawson

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    Severance Hall

    Severance Hall is a concert hall located in the University Circle neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. The hall has been the home of the Cleveland Orchestra since its opening on February 5, 1931. Severance Hall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Wade Park District.

    Photo by Erik Daniel Drost

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    Blossom Music Center

    Blossom Music Center is named after the family of Dudley S. Blossom, who served as president of the Cleveland Orchestra from 1936 to 1938. The site's natural parabolic setting, the pavilion's sloping slate roof, and the area's natural wooded surroundings distinguish it from other contemporary amphitheatres. The facility, designed by architect Peter van Dijk, is located on 800 acres (320 ha) of natural woods inside the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The Michael Stanley Band set an attendance record of 74,404 with four sold out shows in August 1982.

    Photo by Indie Nation

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    Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

    The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was created April 20, 1983. However, it had no home. A petition drive was signed by 600,000 fans favoring Cleveland over Memphis, and a USA Today poll which Cleveland won by 100,000 votes. The groundbreaking ceremony was June 7, 1993, with Pete Townshend and Chuck Berry doing the honors. The museum opened on September 2, 1995, with the ribbon being cut by an ensemble that included Yoko Ono and Little Richard, among others. In addition to the Hall of Fame inductees, the museum documents the entire history of rock and roll, regardless of induction status.

    Photo by Envios

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    Steamship William G. Mather Maritime Museum

    The Steamship William G. Mather is a retired Great Lakes bulk freighter now restored as a museum ship in Cleveland, Ohio, one of four in the Great Lakes region. She transported cargo such as ore, coal, stone, and grain to ports throughout the Great Lakes, and was nicknamed "The Ship That Built Cleveland" because Cleveland's steel mills were a frequent destination.

    Photo by Chris Capell